Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Upcoming Event

On Tuesday, February 21 at 1 pm Town of Macedon Historian, June Hamell, will discuss the books contained in the Bullis Book Library pertaining to Black history.  We will look at the materials, their contents, who brought them into the collection, etc.   From 12 Years a Slave to Frederick Douglass and on to Booker T. Washington, we will look at some of the somber history contained within the Bullis Collection.  This photo shows a large portion of the items in the collection.  We will not be able to cover all of these but will be able to comment on most.  When you look at these items on display in the Bullis Collection please remember that you can't judge a book by its cover.  These books have been through fire and water!!  
The presentation will also be made available on the “Macedon Public Library: Connecting People and Ideas” Facebook page for viewing following the presentation.  Registration is not required.  History teachers and those in the field of education are encouraged to attend along with all who have an interest in history including students.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

WHOSE WOODS THESE ARE ...




"Whose woods these are I think I know." Sound familiar? Of course ... Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." And we did just that today ... that is,  stopped by woods and took the photo above. 

The difference between Frost's experience, as expressed in his poem, and our experience this afternoon is that we know whose woods these are ... they belong to the citizens of Macedon, a very generous gift from Nettie Bullis. 

Ms. Bullis left a sizable parcel of land, now known as Bullis Park, that contains these lovely woods. This time of year, there's little human activity at the park on Canandaigua Road.  However, in warmer weather, the picnic areas,  playing fields, open areas, and playgrounds are popular places for a variety of activities. And of course, the woods can be enjoyed during the summer months as well.

But for the next couple of months, the woods are there for us to stop by and soak up their winter beauty and peacefulness. And while we're doing that, let's remember to silently thank Nettie Bullis for her gift.

And now in case you're racking your brain, trying to remember the rest of Frost's poem, we're including it here for your reading pleasure.

"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"
by Robert Frost

"Whose woods these are I think I know
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep."

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Live from the Bullis Room

Stacey and June read letters from Nettie Bullis Brereton today.  The first letter was from Fort Supply in the Indian Territory (Oklahoma)written in 1883  and the second was from Fort Bayard in southwestern New Mexico written in 1888.  She refers to her brother John (Gen. John Lapham Bullis) frequently in the 1st letter.  Nettie died in June of 1890 at Fort Bayard, leaving a husband and a daughter.

The following is the Facebook address of the video. Please copy and paste into your address bar.

 https://www.facebook.com/directlystacey/videos/vb.1080376824/10209841602971662/?type=2&theater&notif_t=live_video&notif_id=1485371910369138

Enjoy!!

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

LUCKY 7

Happy New Year to all of you.   And now that we have a year ending in the number 7, we decided to focus on some Bullis books that were published in a "7" year.

(Explanation of post title: We also wondered how many manuscripts were submitted to be published during those years, only to be rejected. Have no idea of course, but that's why we're calling the books that "made it" lucky.)

Here's the first seven we picked from the Bullis catalog.  And you're invited to stop by the Bullis Room and spend some time with any one -- or all -- of them.



   Bird Neighbors
Author: Neltje Blanchan
Published:  N.Y.  1907









Captains Courageous
Author: Rudyard Kipling
Published:  N.Y.  1897



History of the U.S. Secret Service
Author: L. C. Baker
Published:  N.Y.  1867






Story of a Bad Boy
Author: Thomas Bailey Aldrich
Published:  1897

Life of Charlotte Bronte
Author: E. C. Gaskell
Published:   N.Y.  1857


A History of Our Times
Author: Justin McCarthy
Published:   N.Y  1857







                                                                    

                                                                    Landlord at Lion's Head

Author: W. D. Howells
Published:  N.Y.   1897

Monday, January 9, 2017

Curious about the Bullis Collection?

Curious about the Bullis Collection?

Tues. 1/10: 3:30 pm – What is the Bullis Collection?  
Presented by Macedon Town Historian, June Hamell,  adult professionals in the field of education are encouraged to attend this session to discover all the historical gems housed within the special Bullis Collection located within the Macedon Public Library.  
June will highlight primary source documents such as diaries, relevant local history materials, a lesson integrating Sir Walter Raleigh’s History of the World, and personal artifacts from the formerly local Bullis Family.  
We've just heard that there may be live streaming on Facebook.  Hmmmm!  Will it work?  Tune in and find out.  

Sunday, December 4, 2016

A CONGRESS OF NATIONS

This week marks the 75th anniversary of the beginning of our country's involvement in World War II. Rather than think of conflict,  we suggest that our focus this week (and in the coming new year)  be on peace.  And we recommend that you read this book in the Bullis Collection that is a collection of essays on promoting peace without resorting to arms.


Prize Essays on a Congress of Nations;
for the adjustment of international disputes, and for the
promotion of universal peace without resort to arms. 
Together with a sixth essay, comprising the
substance of the rejected essays.
By William Ladd (1778-1841), etc.
Published in Boston by Whipple & Damrell, 
for the American Peace Society, 1840.



 According to Wikipedia, William Ladd "was one of the earliest American anti-war activists, and the first president of the American Peace Society." Although other state and local peace societies already existed at that time, Ladd established the American Peace Society in 1828 and was its first president.
Ladd's proposed plan was for a World Congress and Court of Nations, "somewhat similar to the later League of Nations or United Nations." 

And the Lawbook Exchange website reports that this book was "The first important statement on the preservation of peace through international mediation published in the United States. It became a central text for American peace organizations and participants in international law conferences, and did much to persuade Americans to accept the idea of an international peace organization. It was also distributed widely in Europe, where it was well-received."

As we've mentioned in prior posts, the Bullis family members,  throughout the generations, always supported and served their country in wartimes.  The presence of William Ladd's book in the Bullis Collection indicates they possibly were also supportive of the author's premise of "promoting peace without resorting to arms."  Perhaps those of us today, by reading this book, can get an idea of what we need to  do individually to help bring about peace to this world that we share with each other.

Monday, November 28, 2016

IDLE THOUGHTS

Thanksgiving ... Black Friday ... Cyber Monday ... Holiday Season ... we're in what is possibly the busiest time of year for so many of us.  And sometimes it makes us volunteers want to just crawl into a corner of the Bullis Room, take one of the many good books off the shelf, open it, breathe a sigh of relief, and relax as we slowly turn the pages and take in the words and illustrations found there.

We did just that last week and found what we think is the perfect book to read while the rest of the world buzzes around us:


The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow: A Book for an Idle Holiday

This book was written by Jerome Klapk Jerome (1859-1927) and published in 1890 by Henry C. Holt & Company, New York.  The Goodreads website refers to Jerome as; "English author, known for his humorous essays." 

Humor! Isn't that what we need more of? Especially this time of year? So, when holiday hubbub has stressed you to (or near) the max, we're suggesting that you drop by the Bullis Room and take a look at this book. In case we still haven't convinced you this is a "must read," here's an excerpt from the introduction:

"One or two friends I showed these papers in MS. Having observed that they were not half bad, and some of my relations having promised to buy the book, if it ever it came out, I feel I can no longer delay its issue. But for this, as one may say, public demand, I, perhaps, should not have returned to offer these mere 'idle thoughts' of mine as mental food for the English-speaking peoples of the earth.  What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purpose whatever. All I can suggest is, that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books,' you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change."

Chapter headings include: "On Being Idle"; "On Being in Love"; "On Cats and Dogs"; "On the Weather"' "On Being Shy"; "On Babies"; "On Eating and Drinking".

And now it's time to wish you a happy (and idle) Holiday Season, from the Bullis Room staff and volunteers. 

(Oh ... one more thing - if you'd like your own copy of Jerome's book (or want to purchase it as a holiday gift for a friend or relative), you'll find it on your favorite online bookseller site -- both paper and E-reader versions.)